Planet Swank banner
Planet Swank
A proud member of the reality-based community
us flag courtesy south knox bubba
about me
my résumé (pdf)
email me
wish list


 

Your host
me
 

Change background
swanky tiki daddio-sober-128-blue chunky128
cousteau eames-blue2128 jazzy-23
jazzy-19 martini-rhapsody omega-23
omega-6 moptops-11 quicksand (tiki!)

background changing script courtesy codebelly.com

(many backgrounds courtesy pixeldecor)
 

Memeorandum
 

GOP Value$
 

Media Matters for America
 

Recommended:
destroy all monsters
megatokyo
sinfest
8-bit theatre
the onion
mac hall
penny arcade
twisted kaiju theater
this modern world
dilbert
doonesbury
giant robot
8bit joystick
retrolounge
teleport city
stomp tokyo
cold fusion video reviews
1000 Misspent Hours And Counting
kung fu cinema
anime web turnpike
random abstract
radio paradise
npr
voice of america
neil gaiman
william gibson
greg costikyan
xeni jardin
nasa's astronomy picture of the day
techrepublic
u.s. constitution
the democratic party's blog
dbunker
the stakeholder
indiana democratic party
indiana democratic club
center for american progress
donkey rising
tompaine.com
fark
boing boing
metafilter
kuro5hin
gizmodo
wikipedia
the hoosier review
misleader
spinsanity
the daily howler
this modern world
the joe bob report
gamespot
quake 2
 

Blogs:
nextblog (random)
blogdex
memeorandum
the daou report
daypop
the truth laid bear
technorati
the lefty directory
states writes
indiana blogs

#!-usr-bin-girl
alas, a blog
alicublog
altercation
angry bear
annatopia
approximately perfect
balkinization
bertrand russel
blah3
blog left
blog of the moderate left
blue streak
body and soul
bookslut
brut4c
busy, busy, busy
byzantium's shores
chris c. mooney
collaboratory
confessions of a g33k
cooped up
corrente
counterspin central
critiques of editorials
crooked timber
daily kos
daniel drezner
demagogue
democratic veteran
destroy all blogs
die puny humans
electablog
electrolite
eschaton
ezra klein
fafblog
fester's place
flit
founding issues
freeway blogger
geisha asobi blog
gorilla-a-go-go
how appealing
hullabaloo
i love everything
intel dump
interesting times
it's still the economy, stupid
jack o'toole
james woolcott
jesus' general
juan cole
just a bump in the beltway
kieran healy
lance mannion
late night thoughts
lawyers, guns and money
legal fiction
lillianchan
long story, short pier
mah two cents
majikthise
making light
mark a. r. kleiman
martini republic
matt welch
matthew
maxspeak!
mean old man
meryl yourish
michael bérubé
min jung kim
modulator
monkeywatch
mydd
nathan newman
never trust a monkey
new donkey
nitpicker
no more mister nice blog
notes on the atrocities
not geniuses
octopus dropkick
off the kuff
oliver willis
oni blogger
onye's livejournal
open source politics
orcinus
pacific views
pandagon
peevish
pharyngula
philosoraptor
p.l.a.
political aims
political animal
political wire
respectful of otters
roger ailes
ruminate this
rungu
sadly, no!
scoobie davis
seeing the forest
self made pundit
semi-daily journal (brad delong)
shadow of the hegemon
shakespeare's sister
shrillblog
sisyphus shrugged
sixdifferentways
slacktivist
skeptical notion
skippy the bush kangaroo
south knox bubba
swanky conservative
tachyon city
talking points memo
talkleft
tapped
tbogg
terminus
testify!
the 18½ minute gap
the adventures of accordionguy in the 21st century
the agonist
the american street
the avocado couch
the blog of chloë and pete
the bull moose
the campaign desk
the cunning realist
the dead parrot society
the decembrist
the gadflyer
the gamer's nook
the left coaster
the light of reason
the panda's thumb
the peking duck
the people's republic of seabrook
the poor man
the power pill
the rittenhouse review
the road to surfdom
the sideshow
the talent show
the talking dog
the village gate
the volokh conspiracy
thinking aloud
thinking it through
through the looking glass
to the barricades!
tristero
uggabugga
unmedia
unqualified offerings
very big blog
very very happy
wampumblog
warliberal
whatever
whiskey bar
wiley wiggins
wil wheaton
wonkette
world o'crap
wrestlingentropy
 

Archives:
04/14/2002 - 04/20/2002 04/21/2002 - 04/27/2002 04/28/2002 - 05/04/2002 05/05/2002 - 05/11/2002 05/12/2002 - 05/18/2002 05/19/2002 - 05/25/2002 05/26/2002 - 06/01/2002 06/02/2002 - 06/08/2002 06/09/2002 - 06/15/2002 06/16/2002 - 06/22/2002 06/23/2002 - 06/29/2002 06/30/2002 - 07/06/2002 07/07/2002 - 07/13/2002 07/14/2002 - 07/20/2002 07/21/2002 - 07/27/2002 07/28/2002 - 08/03/2002 08/04/2002 - 08/10/2002 08/11/2002 - 08/17/2002 08/18/2002 - 08/24/2002 08/25/2002 - 08/31/2002 09/01/2002 - 09/07/2002 09/08/2002 - 09/14/2002 09/15/2002 - 09/21/2002 09/22/2002 - 09/28/2002 09/29/2002 - 10/05/2002 10/06/2002 - 10/12/2002 10/13/2002 - 10/19/2002 10/20/2002 - 10/26/2002 10/27/2002 - 11/02/2002 11/03/2002 - 11/09/2002 11/10/2002 - 11/16/2002 11/17/2002 - 11/23/2002 11/24/2002 - 11/30/2002 12/01/2002 - 12/07/2002 12/08/2002 - 12/14/2002 12/15/2002 - 12/21/2002 12/22/2002 - 12/28/2002 12/29/2002 - 01/04/2003 01/05/2003 - 01/11/2003 01/12/2003 - 01/18/2003 01/19/2003 - 01/25/2003 01/26/2003 - 02/01/2003 02/02/2003 - 02/08/2003 02/09/2003 - 02/15/2003 02/16/2003 - 02/22/2003 02/23/2003 - 03/01/2003 03/02/2003 - 03/08/2003 03/09/2003 - 03/15/2003 03/16/2003 - 03/22/2003 03/23/2003 - 03/29/2003 03/30/2003 - 04/05/2003 04/06/2003 - 04/12/2003 04/13/2003 - 04/19/2003 04/20/2003 - 04/26/2003 04/27/2003 - 05/03/2003 05/04/2003 - 05/10/2003 05/11/2003 - 05/17/2003 05/18/2003 - 05/24/2003 05/25/2003 - 05/31/2003 06/01/2003 - 06/07/2003 06/08/2003 - 06/14/2003 06/15/2003 - 06/21/2003 06/22/2003 - 06/28/2003 06/29/2003 - 07/05/2003 07/06/2003 - 07/12/2003 07/13/2003 - 07/19/2003 07/20/2003 - 07/26/2003 07/27/2003 - 08/02/2003 08/03/2003 - 08/09/2003 08/10/2003 - 08/16/2003 08/17/2003 - 08/23/2003 08/24/2003 - 08/30/2003 08/31/2003 - 09/06/2003 09/07/2003 - 09/13/2003 09/14/2003 - 09/20/2003 09/21/2003 - 09/27/2003 09/28/2003 - 10/04/2003 10/05/2003 - 10/11/2003 10/12/2003 - 10/18/2003 10/19/2003 - 10/25/2003 10/26/2003 - 11/01/2003 11/02/2003 - 11/08/2003 11/09/2003 - 11/15/2003 11/16/2003 - 11/22/2003 11/23/2003 - 11/29/2003 11/30/2003 - 12/06/2003 12/07/2003 - 12/13/2003 12/14/2003 - 12/20/2003 12/21/2003 - 12/27/2003 12/28/2003 - 01/03/2004 01/04/2004 - 01/10/2004 01/11/2004 - 01/17/2004 01/18/2004 - 01/24/2004 01/25/2004 - 01/31/2004 02/01/2004 - 02/07/2004 02/08/2004 - 02/14/2004 02/15/2004 - 02/21/2004 02/22/2004 - 02/28/2004 02/29/2004 - 03/06/2004 03/07/2004 - 03/13/2004 03/14/2004 - 03/20/2004 03/21/2004 - 03/27/2004 03/28/2004 - 04/03/2004 04/04/2004 - 04/10/2004 04/11/2004 - 04/17/2004 04/18/2004 - 04/24/2004 04/25/2004 - 05/01/2004 05/02/2004 - 05/08/2004 05/09/2004 - 05/15/2004 05/16/2004 - 05/22/2004 05/23/2004 - 05/29/2004 05/30/2004 - 06/05/2004 06/06/2004 - 06/12/2004 06/13/2004 - 06/19/2004 06/20/2004 - 06/26/2004 06/27/2004 - 07/03/2004 07/04/2004 - 07/10/2004 07/11/2004 - 07/17/2004 07/18/2004 - 07/24/2004 07/25/2004 - 07/31/2004 08/01/2004 - 08/07/2004 08/08/2004 - 08/14/2004 08/15/2004 - 08/21/2004 08/22/2004 - 08/28/2004 08/29/2004 - 09/04/2004 09/05/2004 - 09/11/2004 09/12/2004 - 09/18/2004 09/19/2004 - 09/25/2004 09/26/2004 - 10/02/2004 10/03/2004 - 10/09/2004 10/10/2004 - 10/16/2004 10/17/2004 - 10/23/2004 10/24/2004 - 10/30/2004 10/31/2004 - 11/06/2004 11/07/2004 - 11/13/2004 11/14/2004 - 11/20/2004 11/21/2004 - 11/27/2004 11/28/2004 - 12/04/2004 12/05/2004 - 12/11/2004 12/12/2004 - 12/18/2004 12/19/2004 - 12/25/2004 01/02/2005 - 01/08/2005 01/09/2005 - 01/15/2005 01/16/2005 - 01/22/2005 01/23/2005 - 01/29/2005 01/30/2005 - 02/05/2005 02/06/2005 - 02/12/2005 02/13/2005 - 02/19/2005 02/20/2005 - 02/26/2005 02/27/2005 - 03/05/2005 03/06/2005 - 03/12/2005 03/13/2005 - 03/19/2005 03/20/2005 - 03/26/2005 03/27/2005 - 04/02/2005 04/03/2005 - 04/09/2005 04/10/2005 - 04/16/2005 04/17/2005 - 04/23/2005 04/24/2005 - 04/30/2005 05/01/2005 - 05/07/2005 05/08/2005 - 05/14/2005 05/15/2005 - 05/21/2005 05/22/2005 - 05/28/2005 05/29/2005 - 06/04/2005 06/05/2005 - 06/11/2005 06/19/2005 - 06/25/2005 07/03/2005 - 07/09/2005 07/17/2005 - 07/23/2005 09/25/2005 - 10/01/2005 10/02/2005 - 10/08/2005 10/16/2005 - 10/22/2005 10/23/2005 - 10/29/2005 10/30/2005 - 11/05/2005 11/13/2005 - 11/19/2005 11/27/2005 - 12/03/2005 12/04/2005 - 12/10/2005 12/11/2005 - 12/17/2005 03/05/2006 - 03/11/2006
-- current --


L337 lexicon
...speak l337?
(image courtesy megatokyo)
L33t/l33+: elite
b33r: beer
h4x0r: hacker
j00: you
L4m3: lame
L33t: elite
ph33r: fear
sux0rz: sucks
sw33t: sweet
w00t: woo hoo!
download a l33+ 5p34k generator here

Site Feed

xml feeds courtesy Feed2js

referral tracking courtesy truefresco.org

link to me
link to me



background image source file courtesy vegas vic's tiki lounge
some other background images courtesy pixeldecor

random quote javascript provided by
javascript kit



indianapolis weather:
The WeatherPixie
Google
This page is powered by Blogger. Why isn't yours?

  xThursday, April 21, 2005

movie of the evening / new at dam


demon city shinjuku

This evening I spent re-watching the excellent 1988 anime OAV Demon City Shinjuku and completing a review, which is now posted at Destroy All Monsters. I've now managed four reviews in four days, working toward a goal of seven in seven.

Here's another review at DVD Times.

That's it for tonight, I'm afraid; I doubt I'll even get any DDR in, but rather will just crash.





  x

comix post of the day


sin city graphic novel sin city graphic novel

Some weeks ago, I ordered the other two Sin City graphic novels that formed the core of the recent movie, "The Big Fat Kill" and "That Yellow Bastard." (I already own the first edition of the original Sin City story, later titled "The Hard Goodbye.") They arrived today -- w00t!





  xWednesday, April 20, 2005

new at dam


burn-up scramble

My review of the fan-service-rific anime series Burn-Up Scramble is now posted at Destroy All Monsters. That's three reviews in three days, going for seven in seven.

I'm kind of bushed, though, so except for the two cross-postings this evening, that's probably it. I hope to catch up more blogging tomorrow.





  x

ddig this


insane ddr stunt

Check out this insane video (mirror) of some L33t kid performing a tricky Dance Dance Revolution level.

No big deal, you say? Did I mention he's simultaneously juggling three bowling pins? 4w3s0m3!!!

(via BoingBoing; cross-posted at Destroy All Monsters)

For my own part, I haven't played DDR in a while. I need to haul out my dance pads soon.





  x

say hello...


destroy all monsters (the movie)

...to Sixties City's great page devoted to kaiju eiga. The main site appears to be down, but the kaiju pages are still available, so enjoy!

(Cross-posted at Destroy All Monsters)





  xTuesday, April 19, 2005

trivial post of the day


Slate reports on the decline of the popular board game Trivial Pursuit.
For the trivia itself, Abbott and Haney zeroed in on baby-boomer nostalgia. The game concerns itself with useless information, yes, but useless information of a very specific sort: detritus from the 1950s, 1960s, and early 1970s, which flattered the baby boomer by making his golden years seem vital, even historic. The theme held for questions ranging from foreign affairs ("Which eye did Moshe Dayan wear a patch over?") to television ("Who was Howdy Doody's twin brother?") to the Beatles ("Who replaced Pete Best?"). Abbot and Haney added just enough happy-hour impishness to keep the game from becoming too earnest. What's the largest diamond in the world? Why, a baseball diamond!

Trivial Pursuit became a great repository of middlebrow culture. Flip through a stack of cards at random and you assemble a list of middlebrow writers (James Thurber, Gore Vidal), movies (Mutiny on the Bounty, Love Story), and television shows (Gunsmoke). In 1983, a marketing consultant named Linda Pezzano shipped board games to actors featured in the entertainment questions. Pat Boone, Gregory Peck, and James Mason sent back adoring fan letters, which Selchow & Righter used in promotions. When Time reported that Trivial Pursuit had become popular with the cast of The Big Chill—the quintessential boomer flick—the game attained a newfound cachet. To win at Trivial Pursuit was to achieve something greater than mastering a board game. It was to achieve mastery of one's subculture: to have successfully determined which bits of information to retain (anything about Gunsmoke) and which to discard (anything about Rimbaud).

...Whether one memorized the questions or not, the original Trivial Pursuit contained a finite amount of entertainment. As the years passed, Abbott and Haney worked furiously to reinvent the franchise, creating new editions like "All-Star Sports" and "Baby Boomer" (which seemed slightly redundant). Purists, though, ignored the new games and gravitated back to the blue box; 23 years after its American debut, the original edition still accounts for a huge percentage of Trivial Pursuit's 80 million units sold.

This runs counter to the spirit of most board games—like Monopoly and Scrabble—which promise endless permutations. Trivia, it turns out, is nonrenewable. The Genus Edition so ably flattered boomers that they saw no need to buy later editions that included questions about, say, Melrose Place. What about children of boomers, Trivial Pursuit's other major demographic? They were warned away from the original—the box declared, "Age: Adult"—which of course made mastering the original game even more enticing. To compete at Trivial Pursuit, and maybe answer a question or two, was to secure a seat at the adult table. I remember my grandparents' astonishment when I correctly answered that Radar O'Reilly's favorite drink was Grape Nehi—a fact I'm pretty sure I learned directly from a Trivial Pursuit card. However sacredly boomers regard their nostalgia, it turns out their children regard it as more precious than their own.

Then came the Internet: How could Trivial Pursuit survive in the age of Google? The Internet has rewritten the rules of the game. The old measure of the trivia master was how many facts he could cram into his head. The new measure is how nimbly he can manipulate a search engine to call up the answer. The ABC show Who Wants To Be a Millionaire included a lifeline called "phone-a-friend," in which a desperate contestant was supposed to call upon the knowledge of a smart companion. Seconds after the contestant dialed for help, you could hear the guy on the other end pecking away at a keyboard—Googling—and I thought, This is it. Trivia is dead.

I love Trivial Pursuit, but I don't get much chance to play. Still, as long as Googling isn't allowed during a game session, the game should still reward the large amount of useless knowledge I have crammed into my head.





  x

movie of the evening


american yakuza

The other day, when selecting an item or two from my Amazon.com wish list, I happened upon the entry for an obscure, apparently direct-to-video flick called American Yakuza, starring Viggo Mortensen and Ryo Ishibashi (Audition). I bought it on a whim, since it was cheap and my lovely wife's a big Mortensen fan. It proved to be a stylish and entertaining flick. Taken from a story by producer Takashige Ichise, it tells the ever-popular "conflicted cop undercover among honorable gangsters" story, although there are no doves flying around in the climactic shootout.

Update: Here's a review of the film, and here's a brief online diary of shooting by the film's cinematographer! c00L!





  x

new at dam


rouge

Two reviews in two days, working toward a goal of seven and seven. My review of Rouge (Yin ji kau), a romantic Hong Kong ghost story starring the late Anita Mui and Leslie Cheung, is now posted at Destroy All Monsters. I'd chanced upon the DVD at my local library several weeks ago.





  x

new pope


Say hello to Benedict XVI.

I don't have much comment, save that I was hping the selection would be less obviously doctrinaire. Still, Benedict may have some surprises in store, and at age 79, he's unlikely to have the long tenure in office his predecesor did.





  xMonday, April 18, 2005

new at dam


lone wolf and cub still

My review of the classic chambara (samurai) flick Lone Wolf and Cub: Sword of Vengeance is now posted at Destroy All Monsters. I'm attempting to post seven reviews in seven days, so wish me luck.





  x

fishy thoughts


Sharing our Five Year Old's experiences surrounding her first loss of a pet has given me occasion to reflect, and a greater insight into her personality. One thing we've known about our Five Year Old is that she's very dramatic, but her reactions to the loss remind me that she's also genuinely sensitive. She took her responsibility to feed her fish very seriously, and she blamed herself for its death. (One of the things she kept repeating when she discovered it was how sorry she was.) She also seems resolved to remember her fish -- one of the reasons we got one of those craft project mosaic blocks was so she could create a stone that will help her remember. (She made a picture of the fish using the mosaic pieces.) Cecilia spent the weekend talking to anyone who would listen about her fish, and I think talking it out helped her come to grips with her feelings.

I found myself with conflicting feelings as I shared her grieving. Of course, I would have gladly protected her from the pain she felt, but at the same time, loss is an inevitable part of life, and if one is overprotective, one's kids will be woefully unprepared for life. I've been impressed with the maturity Cecilia has shown in dealing with her loss -- she's expressed her emotion as part of accepting what happened, and that's enabled her to move on. And I made sure to tell her how proud I was of her, and how sorry I was that she was sad.

She has a new fish now, and she checked on it several times after we brought it home. Fortunately, goldfish (and non-gold carp) are fairly hardy creatures, and since we've taken steps to avoid a repeat of the accident that doomed the first one, we hope she'll enjoy caring for this fish for quite some time.





  x

happy blog-aversary...


...to me and Atrios. Both our blogs are three years old.






Recent referrals